breaking.it.down
April 21st, 2014

sancophaleague:

Kanye West and Common have teamed up with the Chicago Urban League to help create 20,000 jobs for their native city’s youth.

Common spoke about the city’s vast employment problems at a press conference announcing the team up: “Obviously, one of the biggest reasons our kids are going through what they’re going through is because of poverty. I was doing an event in the neighbourhood and there were some kids from Englewood and I said, ‘Man, what do y’all really need? What’s gonna stop this?’ And they were like, ‘We need money. Man, if we could work.’ They want a chance.”

It’s always to great thing to see two Chicago natives give back to their community!

Post made by: @oba_Tayo

April 18th, 2014

If you’re in Chicago and you got loans, you should definitely check this out

April 17th, 2014
April 17th, 2014

Hampton Alumna Sums Up HBCU Relevance in One Paragraph

thehbcudigest:

Hampton Alumna Sums Up HBCU Relevance in One Paragraph

Mia Hall is a graduate of Hampton University and Harvard University. She writes on the Grio today about the core of the historically Black college experience, and the way it prepares students for the rigors of advanced degree study and professional life.

In what would normally amount to the size of a personal Facebook post, Hall expertly delivers the goods on why HBCUs remain relevant today, for…

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Reblogged from Rock The Blue & White
April 16th, 2014
Black ain’t a color: Black is a spirit, and it is ubiquitous.
April 16th, 2014
April 12th, 2014
damionkare:

penis-hunger-games:

blacketiquette:

a-myriad-of-marvels:

curlcollection:

RIP Domineque aka LongHairDontCare2011
Donineque Banks better known to the natural hair community as LongHairDontCare2011 on YouTube has lost her battle with Lupus at the young age of 27.  

So sad & shocking. RIP

oh my goosh. RIP.</3

The second sister we’ve lost this week. Omg, I am so sorry. I did not know this young woman personally but clearly she made an impact. RIP.

Gone Too Soon. Rest In Peace.

damionkare:

penis-hunger-games:

blacketiquette:

a-myriad-of-marvels:

curlcollection:

RIP Domineque aka LongHairDontCare2011

Donineque Banks better known to the natural hair community as LongHairDontCare2011 on YouTube has lost her battle with Lupus at the young age of 27.  

So sad & shocking. RIP

oh my goosh. RIP.</3

The second sister we’ve lost this week. Omg, I am so sorry. I did not know this young woman personally but clearly she made an impact. RIP.

Gone Too Soon. Rest In Peace.

Reblogged from Evolution Of A Queen
April 12th, 2014

undressmysoul:

Are you ok? is a question that goes a long way… RIP Karyn

Reblogged from undressmysoul
April 7th, 2014

america-wakiewakie:

Studies Confirm the Dehumanization of Black Children and the ‘Preschool-to-Prison Pipeline’ | Common Dreams 

Although African-Americans constitute only 13 percent of all Americansnearly half of all prison inmates in the U.S. are black. This startling statistic has led the United Nations Human Rights Committee to publicly criticize the U.S. for its treatment of African-Americans. A number of recent studies and reports paint a damning picture of how American society dehumanizes blacks starting from early childhood.

Racial justice activists and prison abolition groups have long argued that the “school-to-prison” pipeline funnels young black kids into the criminal justice system, with higher rates of school suspension and arrest compared with nonblack kids for the same infractions. More than 20 years ago, Smith College professor Ann Arnett Ferguson wrote a groundbreaking book based on her three-year study of how black boys in particular are perceived differently starting in school. In “Bad Boys: Public Schools in the Making of Black Masculinity,” Ferguson laid out the ways in which educators and administrators funneled black male students into the juvenile justice system based on perceived differences between them and other students.

Today this trend continues with record numbers of suspensions as a result of “zero-tolerance” school policies and the increasing presence of campus police officers who arrest students for insubordination, fights and other types of behavior that might be considered normal “acting out” in school-aged children. In fact, black youth are far more likely to be suspended from school than any other race. They also face disproportionate expulsion and arrest rates, and once children enter the juvenile justice system they are far more likely to be incarcerated as adults.

Even the Justice Department under President Obama has understood what a serious problem this is, issuing a set of new guidelines earlier this year to curb discriminatory suspension in schools.

But it turns out that negative disciplinary actions affect African-American children starting as early as age 3. The U.S. Department of Education just released a comprehensive study of public schools, revealing in a report that black children face discrimination even in preschool. (That preschool-aged children are suspended at all is hugely disturbing.) Data from the 2011-2012 year show that although black children make up only 18 percent of preschoolers, 42 percent of them were suspended at least once and 48 percent were suspended multiple times.

Consistent with this educational data and taking into account broader demographic, family and economic data for children of various races, broken down by state, is a newer study released this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation that found African-American children are on the lowest end of nearly every measured index including proficiency in math and reading, high school graduation, poverty and parental education. The report, titled Race for Results, plainly says, “The index scores for African-American children should be considered a national crisis.”

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: Shutterstock)

Reblogged from bag lady.
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Breaking.It.Down is an online community started by black students for black students aspiring towards higher education. It is our goal to ease the challenge of balancing school, work, community involvement and fun. Therefore, Breaking.It.Down is a movement, one in which black students, from different backgrounds, schools and environments work together to break down barriers and achieve our goals.

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